HuttNZ Weekly Video Review 11 February 2020

HuttNZ Weekly Video Review 11 February 2020

British and European Car Rally 2020 was held at Trentham Memorial Park on Sunday 9 February. This is the largest gathering of these cars both modern and vintage in the North Island.

Hutt City Council is predicting a rate increase of 8% for residential properties. With some areas looking at 15% (Wainuiomata). This is after years of low increases from 2000-2018. The council is trying to reduce a $17.9 million budget deficit. 

By their nature, residential property rates are always a point of contention but an increase of this size has lite up local social media, with residents questioning how this has come to pass, and how unacceptable this is to many.

Wellington Water has asked residents to conserve water. One could suggest that given infrastructure projects are on the long term HCC agenda meeting today, than an approach to Wellington Water (Wellington Water is jointly owned by the Hutt, Porirua, Upper Hutt and Wellington city councils, South Wairarapa District Council and Greater Wellington Regional Council) about residential water capacity needs to be asked, given the so called growth of both Hutt cities.

Ever February we hit a water hump, yet in 20 weeks time it all will be pouring down our drains. We are missing something here.

Sunday February 9th night saw the most beautiful Super moon rise over the Hutt Valley.

And finally, as they say “Only in the #Hutt” this bloke found the best way to move his sofa was via shanks pony – on his back – to the err of many motorists in Eastbourne.

Hutt City Council discuss Naenae Pool and impact on community at extraordinary Council meeting

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Hutt Valleys Main Sewerage Pipeline leaks again

Hutt City Council is back in the proverbial.

After seven weeks and $500,000 spent fixing the Hutt Valley’s main sewerage pipeline, a new leak means council workers must walk all 18 kilometres of the waste expressway to plug the holes.

The first sign of the problem came on Saturday morning when effluent bubbled to the surface near the centre of Eastbourne while the pipe was being refilled. Despite this saga, the council says the pipeline is in “good condition” and that talk of a $20 million replacement is premature. About 2.5 million cubic metres of treated effluent has poured into Wellington Harbour since the first leak was found in March and the pipeline shut down. More than 1 million cubic metres will follow suit over an extra month of repairs, that will cost at least another $100,000. While the last repair job used CCTV cameras to identify leaks, this time council workers will physically walk the pipeline to spot any missed leaks.

Council city services general manager Bruce Sherlock said the first round of repairs which identified 11 leaks was finished last week. Refilling of the pipeline was about two-thirds complete when the new leak surfaced near Rimu St in the central shopping area of Eastbourne. Unlike most of the other leaks, the latest one stemmed from a crack in the pipeline and would require excavation work, Mr Sherlock said. “It’s frustrating … We regret it obviously and, once again, we’ll work as quickly as we can to get it fixed.”

The pipeline had since been emptied again at discharge points along the coastline. As a precaution, signs were put up at several bays warning people not to swim or collect shellfish in the area. However, he said all of the council’s tests had shown negligible health risks from the effluent which was usually of a higher quality than Wellington Harbour after a storm. Asked if the new leak meant the pipeline should be replaced, Mr Sherlock said the council’s position had not changed. “We’ve done the CCTV inspection, which confirmed what we already thought, which is that the pipe itself is in good condition.” But the walk-through could still provide new information, he said.

Eastbourne Community Board chairman Ian Young said the repeated discharges were concerning though a council engineer had briefed him on the pipeline. “It’s just fortunate it’s in the middle of winter when fewer people are going swimming.” Most residents wanted to avoid the huge disruption of having the entire pipeline replaced, he said.

via Stuff